Economic Justice

What's the issue?

Poverty is powerful -- in the lives of individuals, at the community level, and in a nation with impoverished social spending.

Poverty is the direct result of economically unjust decisions that destabilize our economy, increase inequality, and undermine our best-laid plans and policies by reducing much needed government revenue.

Poverty increases risk of HIV, and living with HIV is impoverishing for many.

Why we fight

Economic justice (EJ) -- the attainment of rightful access to basic financial and material resources and opportunities -- is a key factor to ending the AIDS epidemic in the United States and around the world.

We believe that achieving economic justice will mean fewer cases of HIV and AIDS, reduced suffering and fewer premature deaths.

What's our network doing about it?

We are shifting the terms of EJ – changing the dialogue from poverty to income, and from government deficits to equitable revenue where the wealthy pay their fair share.

We show the links between HIV/AIDS and EJ issues, joining campaigns and coalitions to tell the stories of our communities and winning changes that affect people living with HIV and those at risk of HIV infection.

We are active members of the Caring Across Generations and Robin Hood Tax campaign, and work closely with the National Working Positive Coalition and Positive Women’s Network of the USA on issues of income, jobs and EJ.

Sign-on letter: Help HIV-positive people get adequate job training

Sign-on letter: Help HIV-positive people get adequate job training

| February 19, 2015 | 0 Comments

This call for organizational sign-ons has been sent on behalf of the National Working Positive Coalition. Deadline: Monday, Feb. 23, 2015 Many people living with HIV and other disabilities need to be able to access effective vocational rehabilitation services to achieve their goals for employment. The state-federal vocational rehabilitation services system is the most comprehensive […]

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Meet Joshua Oaks of HIV PJA at Creating Change!

Meet Joshua Oaks of HIV PJA at Creating Change!

| February 2, 2015 | 0 Comments

This week HIV PJA will join thousands of other social justice and human rights activists in Denver, Colorado at the annual National Conference on LGBT Equality: Creating Change. This conference is an opportunity for advocates from across the US to collectively explore issues affecting the LGBTQ communities. More than that, it is a chance for […]

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HIV and Human Rights into 2015

HIV and Human Rights into 2015

| December 10, 2014 | 0 Comments

Today is Human Rights Day. The HIV Prevention Justice Alliance remains committed to continuing intersectional organizing, advocacy and policy work centering on social justice and human rights in the domestic epidemic. In the past year, we’ve seen remarkable progress in the prevention and treatment landscape. Yet, despite these advances we’ve also revealed the gaps, shortfalls […]

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World AIDS Day 2014: Intersectionality, HIV Justice, and the Future of Our Movement – Part 1

World AIDS Day 2014: Intersectionality, HIV Justice, and the Future of Our Movement – Part 1

| December 1, 2014 | 0 Comments

Intersectionality, HIV Justice, and the Future of Our Movement Part 1: An Introduction to Intersectionality “If we aren’t intersectional, some of us, the most vulnerable, are going to fall through the cracks.”                                                                                                                           ~ Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw HIV thrives in conditions of structural inequity – where the workings of poverty, patriarchy, and other overlapping systems […]

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Revealing the disease burden behind bars

Revealing the disease burden behind bars

| November 25, 2014 | 0 Comments

The rate of HIV/AIDS infections in prison populations is significantly higher than in the general population. However, the problem of incarceration and chronic disease goes beyond HIV. Prison populations are also disproportionately affected by Hepatitis C, other STDs, mental illness and substance abuse. This newly released infographic helps demonstrate these disparities, and the accompanying report, […]

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