Economic Justice

What's the issue?

Poverty is powerful -- in the lives of individuals, at the community level, and in a nation with impoverished social spending.

Poverty is the direct result of economically unjust decisions that destabilize our economy, increase inequality, and undermine our best-laid plans and policies by reducing much needed government revenue.

Poverty increases risk of HIV, and living with HIV is impoverishing for many.

Why we fight

Economic justice (EJ) -- the attainment of rightful access to basic financial and material resources and opportunities -- is a key factor to ending the AIDS epidemic in the United States and around the world.

We believe that achieving economic justice will mean fewer cases of HIV and AIDS, reduced suffering and fewer premature deaths.

What's our network doing about it?

We are shifting the terms of EJ – changing the dialogue from poverty to income, and from government deficits to equitable revenue where the wealthy pay their fair share.

We show the links between HIV/AIDS and EJ issues, joining campaigns and coalitions to tell the stories of our communities and winning changes that affect people living with HIV and those at risk of HIV infection.

We are active members of the Caring Across Generations and Robin Hood Tax campaign, and work closely with the National Working Positive Coalition and Positive Women’s Network of the USA on issues of income, jobs and EJ.

Charles Stephens: The problem isn’t black men sleeping with each other, it’s the environment that surrounds them

Charles Stephens: The problem isn’t black men sleeping with each other, it’s the environment that surrounds them

| April 23, 2014 | 0 Comments

In early March, researchers at the 2014 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) revealed a stark 12.1% HIV incidence among young black gay men in Atlanta, Georgia – the highest rate ever measured in any population of a resource-rich nation. We turned to Atlanta-based writer and HIV PJA member, Charles Stephens, to weigh in on this […]

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My Top 3 Gripes on Coverage of Woman-to-Woman HIV Transmission Case

My Top 3 Gripes on Coverage of Woman-to-Woman HIV Transmission Case

| March 19, 2014 | 0 Comments

Top three things about the recent NY Times story In Rare Case, Woman With H.I.V. Infects Female Sex Partner, C.D.C. Says that make my head pop off (noting also that the coverage is in keeping with the tone/content/non-content of the CDC’s  Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report on which it was based…): 1) “… the event was exceedingly rare […]

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A Missing Map, A Stark Southern Story

A Missing Map, A Stark Southern Story

| March 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

Early last week, the Huffington Post featured an article titled These 9 Maps Should Absolutely Outrage Southerners , which collects maps to narrate a stark story of the Southern United States and the number of disparities that persist. These disparities range from tobacco use to poverty, with the author arguing that the data paints a picture […]

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Another Miracle Baby, a Still-Broken System

Another Miracle Baby, a Still-Broken System

| March 6, 2014 | 0 Comments

During the 2013 Conference of Retroviruses & Opportunistic Infections (CROI), HIV PJA’s Jim Merrell wrote a powerful op-ed that galvanized nationwide discussion surrounding the news of the Mississippi “Miracle Baby” that broke at the conference. Although the child was born with HIV infection, very rapid and ongoing treatment with HIV drugs made the virus undetectable. Then […]

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In Advance of Fed Meeting on HIV & Jobs, New Study Confirms Economic Link in Black Gay Men

In Advance of Fed Meeting on HIV & Jobs, New Study Confirms Economic Link in Black Gay Men

| February 6, 2014 | 0 Comments

Just as the Presidents Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS (PACHA) prepares to host an unprecedented panel on employment issues at their meeting at the end of this month, a six-city study of the largest US cohort of Black gay and bisexual men shows a clear link between social and economic factors —  such as unemployment — with  the […]

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