Today is the National HIV Call-In Day to #ProtectHIVCare and #KillTheBill

| June 26, 2017 | 0 Comments
Share

6.26 Call in

The facts are in. Senate Republicans’ bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act will hurt millions of Americans. The Senate bill largely resembles the House bill that would result in 23 million Americans losing healthcare coverage, including 14 million who rely on Medicaid. In fact, over the long-term the Senate bill is even worse! It makes steeper cuts to Medicaid. If this bill passes, people living with HIV won’t be able to access essential care and treatment to stay healthy, and many people vulnerable to HIV won’t be able to access prevention services. In short, this bill is devastating for people living with and vulnerable to HIV. We can and must stop it! 

Join HIV advocates across the country today by participating in the National HIV Call-In Day to #ProtectHIVCare and #KillTheBill. Call the HIV Hotline now (866) 246-9371 to tell your senators to oppose the so-called “Better Care Reconciliation Act”. 

Together, we will send a loud and clear message to the Senate that taking lifesaving healthcare away from people with HIV and millions of other Americans is unacceptable.

PLEASE TAKE TWO MINUTES TO CALL YOUR SENATORS:

  1. Call toll-free: (866) 246-9371.
  2. Enter your zip code when prompted.
  3. Let the staffer that answers know that you are a constituent and a person living with HIV or an advocate or provider working with individuals with HIV.
  4. Let them know that you strongly urge the Senator to REJECT the Better Care Reconciliation Act because it would take healthcare coverage away from people with HIV by capping and cutting Medicaid and weakening key consumer protections.

URGE OTHERS TO TAKE ACTION:

After you call, use these tools to take to social media and to encourage your colleagues, family and friends to take action:

LEARN MORE:

Category: Health Care for our Lives, National HIV/AIDS Policy

Enjoy this post and the work of our network? Donate $5 to help support our work and capacity to confront the injustice of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States.