Webinar Recording: We Are Here – Toward An Advocacy Agenda for Black Gay Men in the South

| July 31, 2014 | 0 Comments
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We Are Here – Toward An Advocacy Agenda for Black Gay Men in the South

Thursday, July 31, 2014

If we believe our lives are priceless we can’t be conquered.
– Essex Hemphill

Join the Counter Narrative Project and the HIV Prevention Justice Alliance on Thursday July 31st from 3pm to 4:30pm EST for a webinar focused on issues facing black gay men in the South and discussion around the development of an advocacy agenda.

Our panel will focus on HIV criminalization and incarceration, mental health and trauma, intersectionality, social justice, engaging faith communities, access and barriers to healthcare, and the role of culture in community engagement, mobilization, and building power. Panelists will offer recommendations around responding to the structural issues that impact black gay men in the South, including the social drivers of HIV.

Panelists include:

  • Louis Graham, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
  • Rashida Richardson, Staff Attorney, Center for the HIV Law and Policy
  • Aquarius Gilmer, Regional Affiliate Coordinator, National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS

Moderator: Charles Stephens, Founder, The Counter Narrative Project

By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify key issues impacting black gay men in the South.
  2. Describe priority advocacy issues around black gay men in the South.
  3. Describe strategies that will advance advocacy efforts in the region.

What: We Are Here – Toward An Advocacy Agenda for Black Gay Men in the South: A Webinar

When: Thursday, July 31 at 3:00pm-4:30pm ET || 2:00pm-3:30pm CT || 1:00pm-2:30pm MT || 12:00pm-1:30pm PT

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Category: Criminalization & Mass Imprisonment, Economic Justice, National HIV/AIDS Policy, Queer & Transgender Justice

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